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Use Eggs as Band-Aids (and Other Tips)

Take eggs beyond the frying pan with these out-of-the-shell tips for healthier hair, clearer skin, tastier coffee, and makeshift Band-Aids.
Use Eggs as Band-Aids (and Other Tips)
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Had a little kitchen accident but the medicine cabinet is bare? In case of (minor) emergencies, the membrane underneath eggshells can be used as a makeshift Band-Aid [1]. Hard boil an egg and peel off the thin membrane between the egg white and the shell. Clear the cut or burn of debris, and apply the membrane for a form-fitting bandage that will act like skin to help keep dirt and dust out of the wound.

Photo by Ben Draper

Eggs also go great in... hair? Yep, the proteins in eggs can add shine, luster, and strength to dry or damaged hair. Beat two eggs with a few tablespoons of olive oil until frothy and apply mixture evenly to the scalp and hair. Let the mixture sit for 20 minutes. And please, don’t forget to rinse it out with warm water afterward (unless trying to rival Lady Gaga with a new "hair frittata" look).

For those looking to eggs-foliate, eggshells can also make a fantastic chemical-free facial scrub. Crush up dried shells until super-fine in warm, soapy water for a mild abrasive that can be used to clear away dried skin.

Here at Greatist, we love our coffee. But for those who want a milder brew, don’t throw out those shells after that morning scramble. Mix empty shells in with the day’s coffee grounds to reduce bitterness. The alkaline (or non-acidic) compounds in shells will help reduce the acidity of coffee.

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Works Cited +

  1. Egg membrane as a new biological dressing in split-thickness skin graft donor sites: a preliminary clinical evaluation. Yang, J.Y., Chuang, S.S., Yang, W.G., et al. Chang Gung Medical Journal, 2003 Mar;26(3):153-9.

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