Recipe: Charred Corn Salad

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This recipe and photo were created by contributor Kelli Dunn of The Corner Kitchen. Learn more about Kelli and this recipe by checking out her accompanying post, and check out her Greatist bio on our About Page!


Have you ever wondered what August tastes like?  Well, wonder no more because it's right here in this bowl (and hopefully soon-to-be on the plate in front of you).  This late summer salad combines sweet August corn (charred on the grill to perfection), bursting ripe tomatoes, and fragrant fresh basil.

If you don't have a grill, no problem! Instead, roast your foil-wrapped corn in a 350 degree oven for 20-25 minutes.

Recipe: Charred Corn Salad

What You'll Need:

4 ears corn, husked
1 pint grape tomatoes, halved
2 tablespoons fresh basil, chopped
1 tablespoon olive oil
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon sea salt

What to Do:

  1. Heat your grill on high. (Or heat your oven to 350 degrees.)
  2. Wrap each ear of corn in tin foil. The whole cob should be covered with just one layer. 
  3. Place the wrapped corn on the grill.  Cook about five minutes per side, using tongs to turn occasionally.
  4. Remove the corn from the grill and let it cool completely.
  5. To remove the corn kernels from the cob, stand the corn upright in a large bowl, and holding the top of the corn, use a sharp knife to cut off the kernels from top to bottom. Discard corn cobs. (You should have about 2 to 21/2 cups corn kernels)
  6. Add the tomatoes, basil, olive oil, salt, and pepper to the bowl of corn.  Stir to combine.
  7. Serve chilled or at room temperature. This dish would go great with anything from grilled fish or chicken to a classic cheeseburger.

What's your favorite way to use up Summer's best corn and tomatoes? Share with us in the  comments below or tweet us @greatist

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About the Author
Kelli Dunn
I've been drawn to the kitchen from an early age - it's where I feel happiest and in my element. I start most days thinking about what I...

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