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Suspension training. Sure, it sounds like a Christian Grey special. But it’s actually a killer way to upgrade your workout, build muscle, improve stability, and boost flexibility.

You’ve probably heard of TRX (short for “total-body resistance exercise”), the most (ahem) dominant brand in the suspension training space. It was invented by a former U.S. Navy Seal to turn anywhere into a training space.

All you have to do is anchor those black-and-yellow straps to a secure spot (like a pull-up rig, a tree branch, a doorframe, or monkey bars) and use your feet, your hands, or just one foot or hand — depending on the exercise — to hold onto the straps.

“The straps allow you to use your own body weight and work against gravity to get stronger,” says Miguel Vargas, TRX training and development manager and senior course instructor. “Because the straps are suspended, there’s an automatic instability, which cranks up core engagement and muscle activation.”

Even if you haven’t worked out since the first “Fifty Shades” was released in 2015, you can use a TRX trainer. “It’s a tool that is literally for anyone,” says Vargas. “Simply switching up the angle will change how difficult the movement is, which means all the movements are infinitely scalable.”

Not already hanging tough with TRX straps? Now’s the time to lose your TRX virginity and give suspension training a try.

Vargas says: “There are no rules. Creativity is the limit here.” [*Insert “that’s what he said” joke.*] With that in mind, we asked people who literally train with TRX straps for a living to share their freakiest and most creative moves.

Below, find 11 moves you probably haven’t tried before, even if you’ve already joined the TRX bandwagon.

How to use this list: You’ll need a TRX suspension trainer. Perform each of the moves for the recommended rep count. You can either incorporate these movements into your own workout circuits or pick one exercise from each section (upper body, lower body, and full body) for a full-body blast and go through them for 4 sets.

And hey, don’t be surprised if these movements are trickier than they sound. TRX straps are meant to challenge your balance and improve your stability, so if you need to cut the rep count in half to do the exercises with good form, we encourage you to do so.

“The more you do the movements, the more your brain and your muscles will know them, and the better your balance will become,” says Vargas.

Ready to show gravity who’s really in charge? Keep reading.

TRX-assisted pull-up

Targets: Back, shoulders, and core

Difficulty: Beginner

Additional equipment: None

How to: Adjust the straps so they’re at about chest height. Hold the handles with a supinated grip (palms facing the floor). Lower your body to the floor so your arms are straight, heels are on the floor, and butt is either planted on or hovering just above the floor.

Draw shoulder blades back and squeeze your scapular muscles. Bend elbows and pretend you’re squeezing lemons in your armpits. As you pull, your legs will unbend and you should feel your body weight transfer from being entirely in your feet to being only partially in your heels.

Pull yourself as high as you can, and then lower yourself for a count of three. That’s 1 rep. Aim for 5–10 reps.

“We like to say that TRX is the best piece of pulling equipment on the market,” says Vargas. “So if you want to get a real pull-up? This will get you there.”

Atomic push-up

Targets: Chest, triceps, shoulders, and core

Difficulty: Intermediate

Additional equipment: None

How to: Adjust the straps so they’re 12–18 inches above the floor. Kneel on the floor, facing away from the straps, and put 1 foot in each stirrup. Raise your body into high plank position with shoulders stacked over wrists, actively pushing into the floor with your palms.

Tuck knees in toward chest by crunching your abs. Keeping knees in, bend elbows back toward ribs until you can’t lower any more. Push back up into a high plank, then extend legs back. That’s 1 rep. Aim for 5 reps.

“Elevating your feet increases the demands on your core and activates your glutes and quads more than a standard push-up,” says TRX expert Sarah Gawron, coach with Ketanga Fitness Retreats. Because this movement is harder than a traditional push-up, Gawron recommends trying it only once you can safely complete at least 5 standard push-ups in a row.

TRX row into I-Y-T

Targets: Shoulders, back, biceps, and core

Difficulty: Advanced

Additional equipment: None

How to: Adjust the handles so they’re 2–3 feet above the floor. While facing the anchor point, grab the handles and lower your body so your arms are straight and heels are planted on the floor. Keeping a long, rigid body and proud chest, squeeze shoulder blades together while pulling elbows back behind your body. This is the row portion of the movement.

Pull the handles out so your body forms an I, Y, or T shape. Straighten your arms to return to the starting position. That’s 1 rep. Repeat, this time trying a different letter. Aim for 9 or 12 reps.

“Think ‘YMCA’ as you extend your arms. Making a letter while under tension increases the demand on your muscles and will strengthen your back, shoulders, and arms,” explains Gold’s Gym fitness expert Brian Ferrari, MS, CSCS.

TRX muscle-up

Targets: Back, chest, triceps, shoulders, biceps, and core

Difficulty: Intermediate

Additional equipment: None

How to: The ring muscle-up is a CrossFit move that combines both pulling and pushing upper-body strength, which means it’s difficult. The TRX muscle-up progression can help you develop both segments of strength while also developing technique.

Adjust the handles to hip height. Hold the handles with false grip (palms down). Lower your body so your arms are extended and your feet are under your hands. Pull yourself up into a low row by squeezing shoulder blades together and keeping core tight as you bend your elbows and pull torso up to meet hands.

Keeping toes on the floor, throw your head and chest forward so your chest is facing the floor and you’re in a triceps dip position. Keeping toes on the floor and elbows tucked into body, straighten your arms. That’s 1 rep. Do 3 reps at a time.

Eccentric TRX box step-up

Targets: Quads, glutes, hamstrings, calves, core, and lats

Difficulty: Easy

Additional equipment: Plyo box, bench, or other sturdy elevated surface

How to: Place a 16- to 24-inch box below the TRX straps, which should be shortened enough so that you can use them to help pull yourself up as you step.

Holding a TRX handle in each hand, place right foot on the box. Drive your weight into right foot, keeping chest up and shoulders back. As you stand up on the box, squeeze your butt to maximize glute activation and use your arms as needed.

Step back down with your left foot very slowly. “You want to lower your leg back to the floor inch by inch to power up your glutes. Use your arms only as much as you need to.” explains Lauren Lobert, physical therapist and owner of APEX Physical Therapy. Aim for a 10-second descent. That’s 1 rep. Do 10 reps on each side.

The TRX box step-up without the eccentric step-down is also a great scaling option for folks who don’t yet feel comfortable or strong enough to perform regular box jumps or box step-ups, says Lobert.

Eccentric TRX hamstring curl

Targets: Quadriceps, hamstrings, glutes, core

Difficulty: Intermediate

Additional equipment: None

How to: Adjust the straps so they’re about 1 foot above the floor. Lie faceup with arms extended by your sides and place your heels in the stirrups. Brace core and lift into a bridge position with your knees bent and your butt off the floor.

Straighten your legs as slowly as you can, aiming for 5–10 seconds. When legs are all the way straight, put your butt back on the floor and bend knees again. That’s 1 rep. Do 10 reps.

“This will strengthen your hamstrings and a little bit your glutes and abdominals as they stabilize,” explains Lobert.

TRX Bulgarian split squat

Targets: Glutes, quadriceps, hamstrings, chest, and core

Difficulty: Intermediate

Additional equipment: None

How to: Adjust the straps so they’re 6–8 inches above the floor. Face away from the anchor point and put left foot in the stirrup of 1 strap. Position right leg about 18 inches in front of the straps. Make sure feet are hip-width apart and hips are squared forward.

Draw shoulder blades back. Keeping chest up, lower your hips into a front lunge position by bending right knee and dropping it straight to the floor while squeezing left glute. Continue lowering until front thigh is parallel with the floor.

Drive up through right heel and straighten right leg to return to the starting position. That’s 1 rep. Do 5–10 reps, then repeat on the other side.

“This works your quadriceps and hamstrings, but it really works your glutes,” says Tracee Gluhaich, CPT, founder of High Energy Girl. “To really feel the burn, slow the descent to 3 to 5 seconds.”

TRX weighted forward lunge

Targets: Glutes, quadriceps, hamstrings, chest, and core

Difficulty: Advanced

Additional equipment: Optional set of dumbbells or kettlebells

How to: Adjust the straps so they’re about 1 foot above the floor. Face away from the anchor point and put left foot in the stirrup of 1 strap.

Step right foot forward into a lunge, making sure your knee isn’t tracking over your toes, while keeping left leg bent behind you. Push through mid-foot and activate glutes to return to the starting position. That’s 1 rep. Do 8–10 reps, then repeat on the other side.

Make it harder: Hold a dumbbell or kettlebell in each hand. As you step forward, make sure to draw shoulders back and keep chest tall.

“I always tell people that if they think they have good balance, they should try a TRX lunge,” says Vargas. “This unilateral movement will help you pinpoint where you are your weakest and strengthen those muscles while increasing total stability.”

Single-leg burpee jump

Targets: Chest, shoulders, triceps, hamstrings, quadriceps, calves, abdominals, and back

Difficulty: Advanced

Additional equipment: None

How to: “TRX can make traditional bodyweight movements easier, but they can also make them more challenging. This variation is a harder, plyometric version of the traditional burpee,” says Alonzo Wilson, certified personal trainer and founder of Tone House.

Adjust the TRX to single-handle mode so it hangs at about calf height. Place left foot in the stirrup behind you and right foot on the floor. Keeping left foot suspended so it’s in line with right foot, drop down into a burpee, making sure chest hits the floor. Raise yourself up into a push-up position.

Jump right foot back between your hands, stand up, and jump up with your hands overhead. That’s 1 rep. Do 10 reps, then repeat on the other side.

TRX forward lunge with chest fly

Targets: Glutes, quadriceps, hamstrings, chest, and core

Difficulty: Intermediate

Additional equipment: None

How to: Adjust the straps so they’re about 1 foot above the floor. Face away from the anchor point and put left foot in the stirrup of 1 strap. Step right foot forward into a lunge while opening your hands overhead and drawing back muscles down so your arms make a V shape.

Push through mid-foot and activate glutes, pushing down on the straps to help you return to standing. That’s 1 rep. Do 8–10 reps, then repeat on the other side.

“After a round of these TRX lunge rows, you will want to apologize to your arms, but this is the best thing for them because it will simultaneously strengthen and stretch your shoulders,” says Vargas.

Squat into reverse fly

Targets: Quadriceps, glutes, hamstrings, calves, chest, shoulders, and core

Difficulty: Advanced

Additional equipment: None

Start facing the anchor point, with feet shoulder-width apart and slightly in front of you. Grip the handles with your arms straight and tension on the straps. Drop hips down and back into a squat. As you stand up, pull the handles apart, squeezing shoulder blades together and spreading your arms into a T shape to complete the reverse fly.

“This is a compound strength exercise, which means you get a big bang for your buck,” says Gawron. “Here, the squat works your glutes, quadriceps, and hamstrings, and the reverse fly works posterior deltoids, upper and mid-back, rhomboids and traps, and core.” Talk about #multitasking.