Ever wonder why we can't seem to stop our noses from running the second the thermometer drops below 32 degrees? This video from the Sci Show says we should blame biology and physics: Our body produces more mucus when it's cold to keep our nasal cavities moist (how delightful), and water droplets form when the hot air in our lungs meets the frigid temps outside. Combined, they get our nose running faster than a marathon runner.

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