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Here’s the skinny on wet dreams:

  • Nocturnal emissions happen when you orgasm in your sleep.
  • They’re called ~wet~ dreams because they can make you jizz.
  • It doesn’t matter if you have a penis or a vajayjay. Anyone can wake up in a ‘lil sea of love 💦.
  • They’re usually caused by erotic dreams.
  • To prevent them, try masturbating before bed and sleep on your back to prevent friction.
  • If you want to have more wet dreams, get turned on before hitting the hay. This might trigger some extra spicy REM cycles.
  • They’re completely normal and nothing to be ashamed of.

A dream is a wish your genitals make

Studies show about 8 percent of dreams contain erotic content. Around 4 percent of peeps climax during their sexy dreams.

Judy Blume tried, but there’s still lots of confusion and stigma surrounding wet dreams.

Wet dreams have a taboo vibe that dates back centuries. In European medieval folklore, people thought wet dreams were caused by a succubus or incubus boning a person in their sleep. Yikes.

Are horny sex demons on your list of worries? Prob not. But wet dreams can still be a weird and uncomfortable topic to approach. Here’s a rundown of the top 10 myths surrounding wet dreams. (Because the video you watched in 8th grade health class def wasn’t enough.)

Myth 1: Women can’t have a wet dream

If you have a coochie, you can have wet dreams. In fact, they’re pretty common. One study showed about 37 percent of college-aged women reported having a sleep-gasm at least once.

It’s also possible to have one without realizing. For the Vag Gang, waking up wet doesn’t necessarily mean you climaxed. Vaginal secretions can occur even if you didn’t reach the Big O.

Myth 2: You have a disease

Wet dreams do not stem from an underlying illness or disease. Wet dreams are normal and aren’t linked with any health conditions. They can even indicate healthy sexual function.

Myth 3: They lower immunity

Some folks believe wet dreams weaken the immune system. Thankfully, no science backs this up.

In reality, orgasms are awesome for your overall health. For those with a ding-dong, nocturnal emissions can alleviate excess sperm from the testes. If you have a vagina, sleep-gasms can reduce built up tension and stress.

Myth 4: They only happen during puberty

Wet dreams are very common during puberty due to hormonal fluctuations. Studies show around 38 percent of pubescent boys have a wet dream before learning what it even is.

While they’re more common during the teenage years, adults can absolutely have wet dreams. Long periods of abstinence or a #NoFap challenge might lead to more frequent erotic dreams.

Myth 5: Nocturnal emissions reduce sperm count

Functioning testicles produce new sperm all the time. Studies show the amount you ejaculate won’t affect your sperm’s integrity. In fact, wet dreams can actually be good for your “product.”

Nocturnal emissions help flush out older seminal fluid. When you come, your testicles will automatically start producing new sperm. This can keep your little soldiers fresh till death.

Myth 6: Wet dreams shrink your schlong

Some believe wet dreams can shrink a person’s penis. This is totally false. There is literally no science to back this claim.

Moreover, unless you’re in a “Honey, I Shrunk the D” situation, your penis can’t permanently shrink. There are no known conditions or illnesses that will diminish the size of your johnson.

Myth 7: Masturbation can prevent them

Taming the one-eyed monster. Flicking the bean. No matter what you call it, masturbation is awesome. But jerking one out before catching Zzz’s prob won’t prevent wet dreams entirely. But it’s worth a shot (or several).

Releasing sexual tension before bedtime might prevent sleep-gasms. Give yourself some lovin’ before you tuck in. If it doesn’t work 100 percent of the time, it might at least reduce the frequency.

Myth 8: Positions don’t matter

Positions matter for sex and sleep. If you’re sleeping on your stomach, your junk can get pressed into your bed or a friendly pillow. This accidental stimulation can cause you to have lusty dreams. If you’re worried about waking up to an unwanted surprise, try sleeping on your back or side.

Myth 9: Friction orgasms (aka fric-gasms) aren’t a thing

Wet dreams are usually caused by sexy dreams. But they can also be triggered by friction (e.g. bedding, pillows, and clothing).

Pro Tip: Sleep in loose underwear or pajama bottoms. You’re less likely to have a fric-gasm in baggy clothing. Plus, the extra layer of fabric is a great barrier between you and your bedding.

Myth 10: Everyone gets them

All dreams are super subjective and personal. A lot of people have them during puberty. Some experience them as adults. Others will never have a wet dream. And all of that is totally okay!

Wet dreams occur when your junk is on autopilot. There’s no surefire method to prevent them since they happen involuntarily. But there are some ways to potentially reduce the occurrences.

Prevention tips

  • Masturbate on the reg.
  • Try to climax before going to sleep.
  • Avoid porn or sexual content right before bedtime. Those images will be fresh in your mind as you doze off. This could lead to erotic dreams.
  • Don’t sleep on your stomach or with a pillow between your legs.
  • Sleep in baggy bottoms.
  • Mediate or do a relaxing activity before bed.
  • Talk to a therapist or medical professional if you’re concerned about your dreams.

Wet dreams are totally normal. But that doesn’t mean they’re not awkward AF. While you don’t have to tell your partner, an honest convo might reduce your anxiety on the topic.

If you want to keep it on the DL, talk to a therapist or medical professional before opening up to your S.O. — just remember, you have nothing to be ashamed of. Sweet dreams!