Vegan and missing yogurt? You’re so not alone.

While yogurt is widely adored for its nutritional benefits, lush texture, and endless diversity, classic yogurt is made from good old classic cow’s milk. So what’s a vegan to do?

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Design by Mekhi Baldwin

Fortunately, the nondairy yogurt industry has stepped up its game, delivering delicious, creamy, plant-based versions derived from soy, coconut, almonds, cashews — and even protein-packed peas. So there are plenty of vegan alternatives to fill the yogurt-sized hole in your stomach.

And while these vegan yogurts skip the dairy and are not a comparable source for protien, they pack in all the gut-healthy probiotics of traditional yogurt, along with prebiotic fiber — a food source for your beneficial gut bacteria that can take your digestion game to a whole new level.

Here are nine plant-based yogurts that deliver on taste, texture, and nutritional profile. But first, a few terms to know before you shop…

There are LOTS of vegan yogurts on the market now, which can make it difficult to choose one.

Your best bet is to search for one that contains little-to-no added sugar and few additives beyond what’s necessary to make the yogurt — namely, plant-based milk or cream, a natural thickener like guar gum or xanthan gum, and live cultures.

If you’re choosing a fruity yogurt, try to stick to the ones that are naturally sweetened only with fruit (they may say “no added sugar” on the label) or that have kept the amount of sugar added to a minimum.

Or, just make it easy and stick to the ones on this list. Although they’re not all 100 percent free of added sugars, none of these yogurts are particularly high in sugar, either. They range from 1 to 15 grams of sugar, compared to dairy-based versions like Yoplait Strawberry Original Fat-Free (26 grams), Dannon Fruit-on-the-Bottom (24 grams) Brown Cow Nonfat Vanilla (29 grams).

What’s in a label? A lot of intel on what’s actually in your food. Here are some of the key things to look at before you buy:

  • Protein. Protein is a powerhouse found throughout your body. This essential macronutrient benefits everything from muscle and tissue health to immunity. The protein content in these yogurts ranges from 3 to 6 grams per serving which is modest — by comparison a 4-ounce sirloin steak has around 33 grams and a cup of lentils around 18 grams. Where does the yogurt get its protein? If you’ve got a soy or nut allergy, you’ll need to choose accordingly.

    Wondering how much protein you should be getting in a day? Try this nifty DRI calculator.
  • Thickeners. The trademark creamy texture of yogurt is everything. In these plant-based versions, thickeners like locust bean gum (from the carob plant), xantham gum (from fermented sugar), and agar (from seaweed) are used to get it right.
  • Sugar. When shopping for a vegan yogurt, be sure to check the label carefully for added sugar. Just because it’s vegan doesn’t mean it’s low in sugar.
  • Price. Dairy-free yogurt is often a bit pricier than dairy yogurt. Expect to pay around $.70 to $1.20 for dairy and more like $1.70 to $1.99 for dairy-free.

1. Kite Hill

Kite Hill makes almond milk yogurts so super creamy and rich, you may not even miss the dairy. (PS: For you cheese lovers, their almond milk brie is legit almost as good as the “real” thing.)

These yogurts are vegan, dairy-free, soy-free, and come in all the favorite flavors — like key lime, peach, blueberry, and vanilla — though the flavored varieties also contain 14 to 18 grams of added sugar.

If you want the the health benefits without the sugar, opt for plain unsweetened Kite Hill and add your own fresh fruit. A 5.3-ounce serving has 130 calories and only 1 gram of sugar.

  • Calories: 130
  • Protein: 5 grams
  • Fat: 11 grams
  • Carbs: 4 grams
  • Sugar: 1 gram
  • Added sugar: 0 grams
  • Fiber: 2 grams
  • Sodium: 10 milligrams
  • Calcium: 4 percent of the DV (daily value)
  • Iron: 1 percent of the DV
  • Potassium: 2 percent of the DV

2. Lavva

Lavva is in a league of its own, even in the world of plant-based yogurts. It gets its perfectly yogurt-y texture from coconut, plantains, and pili nuts (rich in magnesium and vitamin E).

These ingredients provide prebiotic fiber in addition to live probiotic cultures, giving Lavva yogurt a one-two punch of gut goodness. Best of all, there’s no added sugar — Lavva is naturally sweetened with real fruit.

Lavva’s protein count is slightly lower than others on this list. If getting enough protein is a challenge (which it is for many on a vegan diet), that’s something to keep in mind.

A 5.3-ounce container of the Original flavor offers:

  • Calories: 170
  • Protein: 2 grams
  • Fat: 13 grams
  • Carbs: 11 grams
  • Sugar: 7 grams
  • Added sugar: 0 grams
  • Fiber: 1 gram
  • Sodium: 65 milligrams
  • Calcium: 2 percent of the DV
  • Iron: 4 percent of the DV
  • Vitamin A: 4 percent of the DV
  • Vitamin C: 4 percent of the DV

3. Califia Farms

Prefer to drink your yogurt? The plant-based yogurts from Califia Farms are great for when you’re on the go. They’re made from a blend of almonds, coconut, and oats, and pack a whopping 10 billion live cultures per serving.

These yogurts come sweetened and unsweetened, with several classic yogurt flavors. The bottle with its resealable cap makes it a handy ingredient for smoothies and baked goods too.

An 8-ounce serving of the unsweetened plain drink stacks up with:

  • Calories: 100
  • Protein: 3 grams
  • Fat: 9 grams
  • Carbs: 4 grams
  • Sugar: 1 gram
  • Fiber: 3 grams
  • Sodium: 240 milligrams
  • Calcium: 4 percent of the DV
  • Iron: 2 percent of the DV
  • Vitamin C: 4 percent of the DV

Vitamins for vegans

The first three yogurts on this list aren’t fortified with B-12, calcium, or vitamin D, which are important nutrients for those eating vegan. Depending on your goals, this may be important for choosing the best yogurt.

4. So Delicious

So Delicious, a popular source for all things plant-based dairy, offers a line of coconut milk and oat milk yogurts.

One thing that separates So Delicious from the rest of the pack is its added vitamin B-12 (50 percent of the recommended daily intake), especially since B-12 can be lacking in an entirely plant-based diet.

Although they’ve got all the classics covered, they also have some inventive flavor combos (especially for yogurt!) like strawberry rhubarb, spiced pear and fig, spiced blueberry, and salted caramel cluster.

While these may sound like dessert in a cup, the sugar levels aren’t as high as you’d think. A 5.3-ounce serving of the spiced pear and fig weighs in with:

  • Calories: 70
  • Protein: 3 grams
  • Fat: 0 grams
  • Carbs: 15 grams
  • Sugar: 7 grams
  • Added sugar: 6 grams
  • Fiber: 2 grams
  • Sodium: 30 milligrams
  • Calcium: 10 percent of the DV
  • Iron: 2 percent of the DV
  • Potassium: 2 percent of the DV
  • Vitamin D: 10 percent
  • Vitamin B-12: 50 percent of the DV

5. Silk

Silk is a household name in plant-based milks, and they’ve expanded their offerings to include vegan yogurts too.

They offer varieties made with soy milk, oat milk, and almond milk, and over 10 different flavors. With all those options, you’re likely to find one that’s right up your alley.

A 5.3-ounce serving of the peach mango soy yogurt contains:

  • Calories: 120
  • Protein: 6 grams
  • Fat: 3.5 grams
  • Carbs: 17 grams
  • Sugar: 12 grams
  • Added sugar: 11 grams
  • Fiber: 2 grams
  • Sodium: 85 milligrams
  • Vitamin D2: 10 percent of the DV
  • Calcium: 15 percent of the DV
  • Iron: 4 percent of the DV
  • Potassium: 8 percent of the DV

6. Good Plants

Good Plants, from the OG yogurt brand Dannon, is a lower calorie option in the world of plant-based yogurts. It’s got fewer calories and less sugar than other almond milk yogurts, making it a great choice if you’re counting calories.

It also packs a whopping 8 grams of fiber per serving, which can help keep you full while providing a hefty dose of prebiotics.

A 5.3-ounce serving of the strawberry yogurt has:

  • Calories: 100
  • Protein: 5 grams
  • Fat: 4 grams
  • Carbs: 17 grams
  • Sugar: 4 grams
  • Added sugar: 3 grams
  • Fiber: 8 grams
  • Sodium: 30 milligrams
  • Calcium: 2 percent of the DV
  • Iron: 2 percent of the DV
  • Potassium: 4 percent of the DV

7. Daiya

Daiya — known for their tasty vegan cheese alternatives — has forayed into the world of plant-based yogurt too.

Their yogurt is made with rich, smooth coconut cream and comes in several traditional yogurt flavors, including black cherry.

A 5.3-ounce container of the plain yogurt breaks down this way:

  • Calories: 130
  • Protein: 6 grams
  • Fat: 8 grams
  • Carbs: 12 grams
  • Sugar: 3 grams
  • Added sugar: 2 grams
  • Fiber: 1 gram
  • Sodium: 65 milligrams
  • Calcium: 20 percent of the DV
  • Iron: 6 percent of the DV
  • Potassium: 2 percent of the DV
  • Vitamin B-12: 40 percent of the DV

8. Oui

Oui is a line of French-style yogurts from the ubiquitous supermarket yogurt brand Yoplait. Like their mother brand, they’re extra thick and velvety.

Made with coconut milk, Oui will satisfy your cravings for an indulgent, dessert-like yogurt without the dairy. Indulgent comes with a slightly higher calorie count than the other yogurts listed here — and a substantial dose of sugar.

Dairy-free Oui comes in four flavors and an irresistibly cute, reusable glass container that’s perfect for upcycling.

A 5-oz. serving of Oui Coconut contains:

  • Calories: 170
  • Protein: 5 grams
  • Fat: 8 grams
  • Carbs: 18 grams
  • Sugar: 15 grams
  • Fiber: 0 grams
  • Sodium: 75 milligrams
  • Calcium: 15 percent of the DV
  • Vitamin A: 4 percent of the DV

If you’re feeling particularly adventurous, you can make your own vegan yogurt with almond milk or coconut milk.

It’s actually pretty easy — especially if you’ve got a slow cooker or a pressure cooker. A lot of the newer models even have a “yogurt” button — just add your ingredients, press the button, and you’re good to go.

Here’s an easy recipe for vegan coconut milk yogurt, and here’s one made with almond milk. These recipes take only a handful of ingredients, require no specialized equipment, and — of course — give you full control over the quality of ingredients you use.

Not only do plant-based yogurts provide the same probiotic benefits as traditional yogurt, some also contain prebiotic fiber — which can multiply the beneficial effects of yogurt on your gut health.

No need to miss the cow’s milk stuff when you’ve got all these primo options! Keep an eye on added sugar, and look for added bonuses like fortification with B-12, calcium, and vitamin D. Enjoy all the creamy goodness of dairy — without the dairy.