Tabata

The basic formula for Tabata training is a pattern of 20 seconds of work followed by 10 seconds of rest, repeated between six and eight times (for between three and four minutes total).

The goal is to keep the body from fully recovering between sets so that athletes reach their maximum oxygen intake at some point between rounds six and eight [1]. This method of interval training has been shown to improve overall cardiovascular fitness better than intense exercise with longer rest periods [2]. It also prompts the “afterburn effect,” meaning the body continues to burn calories even after it’s stopped performing the exercises [3]. While it’s often applied to cardio exercise, the practice is also suited to all manner of resistance training and  bodyweight exercises.

Learn More:

The Four Minute Workout: Is Tabata Training Effective?
Why Tabata Training Could Become the New Normal
11 Must-Try Moves to Get Started with Tabata
The Complete Guide to Interval Training
10 Interval Training Apps to Download Right Now

Tabata Moves
Want to jump into interval workouts, but not sure where to start? Try these 11 super-effective, expert-recommended moves to kick-start your Tabata routine.
Originally developed for elite speed skaters, Dr. Izumi Tabata's intense interval program has found a near cult following among fitness aficionados. But could Tabata make exercise more accessible than ever?
COLUMN: Renowned fitness author and journalist Adam Bornstein separates fact from fiction when it comes to interval training and provides a custom plan to get you burning fat with almost any activity.

GUEST POST: Chris Beardsley of Strength and Conditioning Research brings us the latest in exercise science, including a new look at Tabata training and whether core-specific exercises really benefit athletes.

Interval training is the best thing for the body since sliced bread. Want to accelerate fat-burn, boost metabolism, and ramp up overall fitness but don't know your Tabatas from your HIITs? Read on for 8 science-backed ways to get going now.

Heading out for an interval run or Tabata workout? There’s an app for that. We’ve rounded up our favorites apps so anyone can on your mark, get set, and hit go!

Pages

Tabata training involves short bursts of intense exercise, and has some serious fitness benefits.

Want a hardcore workout in less than five minutes? Tabata bing, bada BOOM! Try Tabata!

Heading out for an interval run or Tabata workout? There’s an app for that. We’ve rounded up our favorites apps so anyone can on your mark, get set, and hit go!

Interval training is the best thing for the body since sliced bread. Want to accelerate fat-burn, boost metabolism, and ramp up overall fitness but don't know your Tabatas from your HIITs? Read on for 8 science-backed ways to get going now.

GUEST POST: Chris Beardsley of Strength and Conditioning Research brings us the latest in exercise science, including a new look at Tabata training and whether core-specific exercises really benefit athletes.

COLUMN: Renowned fitness author and journalist Adam Bornstein separates fact from fiction when it comes to interval training and provides a custom plan to get you burning fat with almost any activity.

Pages

Works Cited

  1. Effects of moderate-intensity endurance and high-intensity intermittent training on anaerobic capacity and VO2max. Tabata, I., Nishimura, K., Kouzaki, M., et al. Department of Physiology and Biomechanics, National Institute of Fitness and Sports, Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan. Medicine & Science in Sports and Exercise 1996 Oct;28(10):1327-30
  2. Metabolic profile of high intensity intermittent exercises. Tabata, I., Irisawa, K., Kouzaki, M.,  et al. Department of Physiology and Biomechanics, National Institute of Fitness and Sports, Kanoya City, Japan. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise 1997 Mar;29(3):390-5
  3. An acute bout of high-intensity interval training increases the nuclear abundance of PGC-1{alpha} and activates mitochondrial biogenesis in human skeletal muscle. Little, J.P., Safdar, A., Bishop, D., et al. McMaster University. American Journal of Physiology: Regulatory, Integrative, and Comparative Physiology 2011 Mar 30.