Supplements

Fish oil is often portrayed as a cure-all to a host of health issues, from heart disease to eye problems. Is the popular supplement really all it’s cracked up to be, or are the claims a bit fishy?
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Algae, unwelcome denizens of pools and ponds, may seem like improbable candidates for the title “nutritional powerhouse”. But here’s why that scum may actually be a healthier choice.
The world of supplements can be intimidating, but one website is hoping to change all that with a new system that makes good information more accessible than ever.
A new survey from a supplement company suggests exercisers need better education on post-workout nutrition to optimize they’re hard work. Are the findings legit, or is the company just blowing smoke?

Sorry, snifflers and sneezers! Turns out, it might not be worth loading up on vitamin C supplements like Airborne and Emergen-C to combat the common cold.

Caught like a deer in the headlights when trying to choose the right protein powder? Here's an all-inclusive guide to help you pick the right supplement for you.

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Protein is the building block for muscle, but the body's supply is limited in the morning and after exercise. Incorporate a healthy dose into breakfast and post workout to start the path to muscle recovery.

Fish oil is often portrayed as a cure-all to a host of health issues, from heart disease to eye problems. Is the popular supplement really all it’s cracked up to be, or are the claims a bit fishy?

Born a sports supplement, creatine is now slowly migrating into clinical settings, too. But what exactly is the stuff, and is it really dangerous as sometimes portrayed?

Slugging protein shakes is a typical post-workout ritual for many, but is the powdered stuff really superior to regular food?

What’s the vitamin that makes eating all the dairy desired (ice cream doesn’t count) and laying in the sun all day (with proper sun block, of course) Greatist-approved? Say hello to our new best friend, vitamin D.

Think before you supplement. A new government report suggests the majority of immune and diet supplements have misleading information on their labels.

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