As sweet as they are, desserts have a bad reputation. No longer included in the new food guide, desserts do not seem to fit in to a healthy lifestyle. Or is it time to think again? A recent study suggests that people can eat their sweets without worrying about weight gain, at least if they choose wisely.

A Delicious Discovery – The Analysis

A new study suggests that eating dessert may not be detrimental to losing weight. After a three-month study, researchers found that girls who ate several sugar-free, low-fat desserts during the week lost more weight than those who ate one fully loaded dessert a week Desserts With a Low Glycemic Index May Benefit Weight-Loss Efforts for Obese Children. Dastamani, A. Athens University School of Medicine, Athens, Greece. The study's results were presented at The Endocrine Society's 93rd Annual Meeting 6/4-7. . Scientist specifically looked at desserts with a low glycemic index, which affects blood sugar. Foods with a low glycemic index raise blood sugar slower than other foods. which prevents hyperglycemia.

Researchers studied 29 girls from ages 10 to 14, all of whom had a BMI in the 85th percentile. Each girl followed a meal plan consisting of 45% carbohydrates, 35% fats, and 20% proteins. The first group of girl, however, ate four desserts with low glycemic index (GI) during the week, while the second group ate any dessert they wanted. Though researchers found that both groups lowered their BMI, the girls who ate low-GI desserts lowered not only their BMI but also their body weight Desserts With a Low Glycemic Index May Benefit Weight-Loss Efforts for Obese Children. Dastamani, A. Athens University School of Medicine, Athens, Greece. The study's results were presented at The Endocrine Society's 93rd Annual Meeting 6/4-7. . The girls in the first group also increased levels of leptin, a hormone that suppresses the appetite, which can cause people to eat less during the day Desserts With a Low Glycemic Index May Benefit Weight-Loss Efforts for Obese Children. Dastamani, A. Athens University School of Medicine, Athens, Greece. The study's results were presented at The Endocrine Society's 93rd Annual Meeting 6/4-7. .

It is important to note that this study's sample size is relatively small and all-female, with other factors (environment and exercise, for example) not necessarily controlled for. Also, the low-calorie, low glycemic index desserts were produced by the Giotis Company, an Athens-based food company, that helped fund the support. Despite these factors, it still suggests there may be something to people satisfying their sweet tooth a few times a week on the right stuff instead of splurging on the wrong stuff once.

TL;DR

Have your cake and potentially lose weight, too: a new study suggests eating the right kind of desserts could help shed pounds.

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