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Unlimited Protein and Apps: This Week's Must-Read News Facts

Haven’t had time to keep up on the news this week? Not to worry — we’ve summarized the top news stories that could significantly change our health habits.
Unlimited Protein and Apps: This Week's Must-Read News Facts
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Greatist News examines and explains the trends and studies making headlines in fitness, health, and happiness. Check out all the news here.

Photo: nstjerna 

 

 

From the failure of personal health journalism, a brand new diet app, and the idea that there is no upper limit to the amount of protein people can process in a meal, this week had some interesting highlights affecting our fitness, health, and happiness.

And with so many headlines to read, news articles to sift through, and tweets to favorite, it’s nearly impossible to read every story that affects our health. So we’re making it easier for everyone by rounding up our top story picks that are innovative, thought-provoking, or could seriously change some health behaviors.

1. How Personal Health Journalism Can (and Has) Failed

Covering health news is no easy task — and here at Greatist we work super hard to read and report the research right. So that's why this cover story on health journalism is so near and dear to our hearts; it points out the dangers and flaws writers face when covering hot health topics, problems we aim to avoid at all costs. Ranging from topics like caffeine consumption and vitamin D, to what is actually making Americans so fat, it's surprising to see how the web can skew the science and potentially deliver false, even dangerous, news.

Via Columbia Journalism Review

2. New App, Make My Plate, Visually Tracks Your Diet

Tracking food can definitely help people manage their weight, but it's not always fun. That's why Make My Plate created a way to spice up online nutrition tracking. Their new guide allows users to make virtual plates of their meals that mirror what they've consumed. The system breaks down the nutritional info, too, so people can see which food groups they're eating away at. People can share their plates through social media and swap meal plans with friends. Sounds pretty cool to us.

Via The Next Web

Photo: looklovely 

 

 

3. Planet Fitness Launches "No Gymtimidation" Commercial

Let's get real: Sometimes the gym can be intimidating. Planet Fitness agrees and has created a campaign that mocks the uncomfortable feeling people may experience when they set foot on the floor. The commercial markets their chain of gyms as judgement free, laid back, and (because of their ridiculously low membership price) extremely accessible option. So far, so good. Yet off camera, they also offer pizza and bagels at their front desks. Planet Fitness previously ran a campaign discouraging meatheads, while other gyms have tried "banning" skinny people to boost the morale of its clientele.

Via The New York Times

4. There May Be No Limit to the Amount of Protein You Can Eat in a Meal

Recent science has said there is a limit to the amount of protein we can eat in one sitting before its nutritional benefits are no longer effective (about 20-30 grams). But those studies might not have the full picture, including how the body breaks down proteins relative to how much it consumes. A new study's conclusion? There actually is no upper limit to how much protein the body can process in a meal, meaning we possibly could go for a second serving of chicken breast and see a difference.

Via Clinical Nutrition

Photo: krossbow 

 

5. Mom Was Right: Kids Who Eat Family Meals Eat More Vegetables

Mom and dad say "eat your vegetables" for a reason: People listen. A new study found children eat way more fruits and vegetables if they dine with family members, even if that dinner table meal happens only once a week. While this may seem like a pretty obvious finding (assuming families are serving healthy food, of course), the science reminds us how personal eating habits can affect and influence what other people eat as well.

Via Science Daily 

What health news grabbed your attention this week? Let us know in the comments below or tweet the author @lschwech.

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