Genetics

OP-ED: One writer bravely took the 23andMe test to learn what it's like to see her genetic health data — complete with risk levels for serious illnesses — laid out before her eyes. Find out why, in the end, it was an incredibly valuable experience.
Stress can wreak havoc on our minds and bodies. But new research suggests yoga and meditation can actually turn off genes linked to stress, and turn on genes that promote health and wellbeing.
Pants feeling a bit tight? It might not be those cookies you ate. A new study suggests it may be your KLF3 protein levels. Say what? Read on to see how researchers found a link between skinny jeans and skinny genes.
More and more research suggests some people are genetically predisposed to enjoy exercise, while others need more motivation to ditch the couch. It’s a reminder that we need to find the health and fitness routine that works best for us.

Genetics can play a huge role in our health, and scientists may have just discovered one more reason why. The presence of certain “tags” on our DNA can activate the genes that cause diseases such as arthritis.

Could a simple cheek swab tell us how much we’ll benefit from a workout? There’s a new genetic test on the market that may reveal how we’ll respond to aerobic exercise.

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Stress can wreak havoc on our minds and bodies. But new research suggests yoga and meditation can actually turn off genes linked to stress, and turn on genes that promote health and wellbeing.
OP-ED: One writer bravely took the 23andMe test to learn what it's like to see her genetic health data — complete with risk levels for serious illnesses — laid out before her eyes. Find out why, in the end, it was an incredibly valuable experience.

Have two left feet when it comes to soccer, while the kid next door is a natural? There may be a gene for that. But don’t chalk it all up to biology. Good old-fashioned practice could also help make the cut.

Happily ever after isn’t only for fairy tales. When it comes to putting on a happy face, are genetics or environment more important?

Could a simple cheek swab tell us how much we’ll benefit from a workout? There’s a new genetic test on the market that may reveal how we’ll respond to aerobic exercise.

Genetics can play a huge role in our health, and scientists may have just discovered one more reason why. The presence of certain “tags” on our DNA can activate the genes that cause diseases such as arthritis.

Pages