Eating Habits

Our eating habits are important factors in overall health and well being. The types and amounts of food we consume vary significantly from person to person, and individuals often have very different nutritional needs. Finding the right balance of nutrients for your body — and working toward consuming that balance through <a href="greatist.com/appetite-control/">appetite control</a> — is an important step in maintaining a healthy diet. For more on eating habits, including tips on how to learn what works best for you, check out the articles below:

Little changes can really add up to big results. Check out these 89 easy ways to tweak your daily routine and get healthier and fitter fast!

Goals
Ready to make 2014 your best year ever? Check out our 100 science-backed, actionable tips to help you accomplish your goals this year.
Can a bra that monitors the wearer’s stress levels teach us how to avoid eating our feelings? Microsoft believes it can.
For those who believe impulse eating leads to poor nutritional habits, think again. A new study finds that trouble actually arises when we take the time to consider our food choices — in the form of excuses for why that pumpkin pie is A-okay.
For many students heading off to college this fall, the myth of freshman weight gain can be downright terrifying. Is the “Freshman 15” a legit cause for concern, or just an urban myth?
New research suggests mildly depressed people have a harder time distinguishing the taste of fat, meaning they might be more likely to opt for high-fat foods. It’s another example of how our feelings affect our eating habits and our health.

Pages

Little changes can really add up to big results. Check out these 89 easy ways to tweak your daily routine and get healthier and fitter fast!

There might be another roadblock to controlling those portions (beyond the stomach). Our surroundings might also affect eating habits, but there are ways to avoid that outside influence.

Kelly Fitzpatrick reflects on week 5 of her Greatist Challenge.

According to a federal study, children are eating fewer calories and adults are chowing down on less fast food than in years past. What does this mean for the state of our country's health now and in the future?

Take a chill pill at the dinner table. A new study suggests people who eat more slowly tend to eat less.

Kelly Fitzpatrick reflects on her month-long challenge to eat healthy on a budget.

Pages