Depression

Though it’s not uncommon to feel sad now and then, depression describes a sadness that is severe and/or long-lasting enough to interfere with daily life, routines, and relationships.

There are several kinds of depressive disorders, like major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, and dysthymia (a state of prolonged depression that lacks an episode of major depression). Depression is commonly treated with therapy, medication, or both. However, in some cases, exercise and diet can be enough to turn the tide.

Learn More:

How to Deal with Depression in Your 20s
How Exercise Can Help Treat Depression and Anxiety

External links:

Major Depression

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New research suggests mildly depressed people have a harder time distinguishing the taste of fat, meaning they might be more likely to opt for high-fat foods. It’s another example of how our feelings affect our eating habits and our health.

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Need another reason to hit the gym? Besides keeping the heart rate up and the number on the scale down, exercise could also help lessen symptoms of depression and anxiety.

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